[Date Prev][Date Next] [Thread Prev][Thread Next] [Date Index] [Thread Index]

Re: About Testing Freeze and KDE



B. M. wrote:
> Bob Proulx a écrit :
> > B. M. wrote:
> >> I'm using Debian since about a year now, so this is my first freeze :-)
> > 
> > When you say "using Debian" that is not sufficient to really describe
> > what you are doing.  I use Debian Stable on production servers.  I
> > also run Debian Unstable for testing and reporting bugs before the
> > next release.  Others run Debian Testing in order to have a
> > semi-rolling release.
> 
> Sorry, I thought it would be clear from the subject.yes, I run Testing.

Oh!  Yes.  I see that now.  Silly me.  After I opened your message I
was reading the *body* of it.

> >> Is it true that the packages will stay at these version numbers,
> >> also after the release of Jessie?
...

It was the above part of your question that confused me.  Because you
were talking about Jessie and not Sid Unstable / Testing.

> Thanks for the clarification, but in general I think I know how
> Debian works. My question was more that I don't see why Debian
> should use 4.14.2 or even 4.14.1 if upstream released 4.14.3 as the
> last (bug fix) release before porting everything to
> frameworks. Maybe this way of thinking is very KDE focused, maybe
> even on the current situation, i.e. the transition to "KDE 5".
> 
> Put differently, I want to use a stable KDE during the next 2
> years. This means KDE 4, not 5. But if upstream releases some bug
> fixes (e.g. as 4.14.3), will they get backported to 4.14.2? Wheezy
> uses 4.8.4, was that the last one before 4.9? Is everything at
> exactly 4.8.4 (except PIM)?

I see now you are asking why Testing is frozen.  You are asking why
you have not yet seen a new KDE release in Testing yet.  I think that
is the root of your question?  Is that right?  For the last two years
you have been tracking Testing and new releases have been flowing
through but now all of a sudden you have stopped seeing new versions
appearing in Testing.  I think that is what I will read into your
questions above.  Please correct me if I am wrong.

The reason is that Debian is now frozen in preparation for the Jessie
release.  Maintainers are expected to avoid making changes to Sid
Unstable throughout the freeze time.

  https://lists.debian.org/debian-devel-announce/2014/11/msg00003.html

  https://release.debian.org/jessie/freeze_policy.html

This happened 2014-Nov-05.  I see that KDE 4.14.3 was announced on
2014-Nov-11 several days too late to make the freeze.  Effectively
even though Jessie isn't released yet the effective release date was
November 11th, 2014 when Jessie was frozen.  There will be small
changes made in order to polish and fix release critical bugs.  Some
things will change but only those things that are reviewed and
approved of by the release team as documented in the freeze policy.

Sid Unstable and Testing will continue getting later version numbers
as soon as the freeze is lifted.  Jessie is currently Testing but is
the release candidate.  Version numbers in Jessie will generally stop
when it is finally released.  But Testing goes on without Jessie.
When Testing is released as Stable a new name will be chosen for the
next release and that new name will become Testing.

Since you are tracking Testing you won't care about the preparation
for the Stable release.  This is simply an every two year thing that
people using Testing must endure as part of tracking Testing.  Since
Debian has different people with different goals, different visions,
different strategies, different ideas this creates many conflicts.  It
can't make everyone happy but hopefully everyone can compromise.

This whole development process is designed for generating a stable
production release.  This is the current development process.
Previously other strategies were used that did not include the current
freeze strategy and other things.

The process gets debated every so often in the debian-devel mailing
list.  It might change again in the future.  In particular there is a
proposal for a continuously useful testing.  Here is an old article I
found after a quick search on CUT.

  http://raphaelhertzog.com/2010/10/04/can-debian-offer-a-constantly-usable-testing-distribution/

Bob

Attachment: signature.asc
Description: Digital signature


Reply to: