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Re: allocating disk space (was: Upgrade Problem)



David Wright composed on 2019-01-04 14:27 (UTC-0600):

> On Fri 04 Jan 2019 at 13:41:33 (-0500), Felix Miata wrote:

>> David Wright composed on 2019-01-04 10:19 (UTC-0600):

>> > On Fri 04 Jan 2019 at 04:30:00 (-0500), Felix Miata wrote:

>> >>> This partitioning scheme seems really odd and unwieldy.  

>> >> Indeed. Considering the absence of a sysadmin,

>> > What's so unusual about that?

>> Standing alone, absolutely nothing, but it wasn't standing alone....

> (The OP is standing alone, leaving us aside.)

> By snipping the rhetorical question that introduces my paragraph, it
> now appears that "unusual" refers to the partitioning scheme. It
> doesn't.

It wasn't intended to.

> It refers to the absence of a sysadmin. 

Intended.

>> >> absence of 2 possible primary partitions on sda,
>> 
>> > If the OP partitioned an MBR disk intending to subdivide the
>> > filesystem, then it might be expected that they create an extended
>> > partition. Why bother with holding off until you've got two
>> > primary partitions set up first?

>> Off the top of my head:

>> 1-trivial I know, but avoiding seeing fdisk report "Partition table entries are not in disk order"

>> 2-less trivial: partitions not being in disk order

> I don't understand. The time sequence would be

> sda1=primary [                         free                                      ]

> sda1=primary [                      "sda2"=extended                              ]

> sda1=primary [ sda5=logical                            free                      ]

> sda1=primary [ sda5=logical sda6=logical                   free                  ]

> sda1=primary [ sda5=logical sda6=logical sda7=logical           free             ]

> sda1=primary [ sda5=logical sda6=logical sda7=logical sda8=logical possibly-free ]

> What's out of order?

This looks like it's assuming reference to the OP's disk state, which is not what I was writing
about. AFAIK, when entries /are/ out of order, far more steps had to have been involved than those
you listed.

>> 3-potential to have a primary partition added following a logical, thereby making following
>> freespace unavailable for one or more added logicals (disappearing freespace).

> With the scenario above, it would be usual to fill the disk with the
> extended partition, so there's no possibility of adding another primary.

Yes, when filling the disk at the outset. With the escalation of disk sizes over the years, it's
become more common not to allocate 100% at the outset. In non-ancient memory I only ever fully
allocated with my own disks at the outset with data disks, until small SDDs became cheap.

Some partitioning tools are better than others at allowing oneself to shoot oneself in the foot.

> Here's the partition table of this laptop. Care to guess it's
> evolution?

> Number  Start (sector)    End (sector)  Size
>    1            2048         2050047   1000.0 MiB
>    2         2050048         2582527   260.0 MiB
>    3         2582528         4630527   1000.0 MiB
>    4         4630528         4892671   128.0 MiB
>    5         4892672       347348991   163.3 GiB
>    6       347348992       429268991   39.1 GiB     /
>    7       429268992       511188991   39.1 GiB
>    8       511188992       883275775   177.4 GiB    /home
>    9       883275776       883292159   8.0 MiB
>   10       883292160       892084223   4.2 GiB      swap
>   11       892086272       892803071   350.0 MiB
>   12       892803072       894900223   1024.0 MiB
>   13       894900224       947329023   25.0 GiB
>   14       947329024       976773119   14.0 GiB

> Constrained by an inability to repartition the disk, how would
> you distribute a Debian system across it while wasting the
> least space?

That's a bit sketchy. How about you do one of mine?
Number  Start (sector)    End (sector)  Size
   1              63           80324   39.2 MiB
   2           80325          578339   243.2 MiB
   3          578340         1397654   400.1 MiB
   5         1397718         3502169   1.0 GiB     swap
   6         3502233        17848214   6.8 GiB     WinSYS
   7        17848278        30137939   5.9 GiB     /
   8        30138003        35053829   2.3 GiB     /home
   9        35053893        44451854   4.5 GiB
  10        44451918        46540304   1019.7 MiB  /usr/local
  11        46540368        58010714   5.5 GiB     /
  12        58010778        69481124   5.5 GiB     /
  13        69481188        80951534   5.5 GiB     /
  14        80951598        92421944   5.5 GiB     /
  15        92422008       103892354   5.5 GiB     /
  16       103892418       115362764   5.5 GiB     /
  17       115362828       126833174   5.5 GiB     /
  18       126833238       138303584   5.5 GiB     /
  19       138303648       149773994   5.5 GiB     /
  20       149774058       161244404   5.5 GiB     /
  21       161244468       172714814   5.5 GiB     /
  22       172714878       184185224   5.5 GiB     /
  23       184185288       195655634   5.5 GiB     /
  24       195655698       207126044   5.5 GiB     /
  25       207126108       218596454   5.5 GiB     /
  26       218596518       230066864   5.5 GiB     /
  27       230066928       241537274   5.5 GiB     /
  28       241537338       253007684   5.5 GiB
  29       253007748       264478094   5.5 GiB     /
  30       264478158       275948504   5.5 GiB     /
  31       275948568       287418914   5.5 GiB     /
  32       287418978       298889324   5.5 GiB     /

  33       937312488       961361729   11.5 GiB    Win data
  34       961361793       975707774   6.8 GiB
  35       975707838       976751999   509.8 MiB
  36       976752063       976768064   7.8 MiB

Note the relative vastness of unused space.

Can't tell the players without a program:
http://fm.no-ip.com/Tmp/gx62b.txt

BTW, 36 is near an average count here. I have one with 57, more than one with >40, and probably >8
with >30. My newest PC has 50, though spread across 3 disks, with 20 comprising 10 RAID1 devices,
and zero freespace remaining for partition creation.
-- 
Evolution as taught in public schools is religion, not science.

 Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409 ** a11y rocks!

Felix Miata  ***  http://fm.no-ip.com/


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