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Re: Continued problems booting Debian on oldworld G3



On Tue, Dec 11, 2001 at 09:34:41PM +0000, Wayne Pascoe wrote:
> Chris Tillman <tillman@azstarnet.com> writes:
> 
> > After an inspirational look at the boot-floppies todo list, I think I
> > found the answer. At
> > 
> > www.netbsd.org/Ports/macppc/models.html
> > 
> > there are comments about your machine, the main one being that you
> > need System Disk to update your broken firmware. I'll add this to the
> > docs somewhere.
> 
> The saga continues :)
> 
> I setup my machine as follows : Booted OS9 and ran the disk tools. I
> created a 2 gig linux partition, then a 1.8 gig Macintosh extended
> partition and a 3.7 gig Macintosh extended partition. I installed
> OS9.2 to the 1.8 gig partition labeled untitled 2.
> 
> Next, I installed OSX and upgraded to 10.1 on untitled 3. After this,
> I set the startup disk to be the disk with OS9.2 on it and booted into
> OS9.2.
> 
> After unpacking and installing it, I ran system disk and set
> everything as they advised except for the boot-file option. I'm at a
> loss for this option. I hit the save button which according to the
> docs will apply nvram patches.
> 
> The machine now stops at the OpenFirmware menu and does not boot
> anything by default. The startup banner says
> Open Firmware, 2.0f1

Success!

> I then booted off of the woody disks and installed from the
> internet. Towards the end of the install, when presented with the
> option I chose to make Debian bootable.
> 
> An attempt to boot from OpenFirmware doing boot just produces 
> 0 > boot  can't OPEN:

Aargh.

> My partition table looks mostly as follows. I'm tying this, so please excuse
> formatting and typos.
> 
> 
> Command (? for help): p
> /dev/hda                     type name               length    base
>  (size)    system
>         #
> dump: name /dev/hda len 8
> /dev/hda1     Apple_partition_map Apple                   63 @ 1
>   (31.5k)  Partition map
> 
> /dev/hda2        Apple_Driver_ATA Macintosh               54 @ 64
>   (27.0k)  Unknown
> 
> /dev/hda3        Apple_Driver_ATA Macintosh               74 @ 118
>    (37.0k) Unknown
> 
> /dev/hda4      Apple_Driver_IOKit Macintosh              512 @ 192
>   (256.0k) Unknown
> 
> /dev/hda5           Apple_Patches Patch Partition        512 @ 704
>   (256.0k) Unknown
> 
> /dev/hda6         Apple_UNIX_SVR2 Home file system    4096000 @ 1216
>    (2.0G)  Linux native
> 
> /dev/hda7               Apple_HFS untitled 2     3686400 @ 4097216 
>    (1.8G)  HFS
> 
> /dev/hda8               Apple_HFS untitled 3     7782400 @ 7783616
>    (3.7G)  HFS
>  
> /dev/hda9         Apple_UNIX_SVR2 swap            524288 @ 15566016
>  (256.0M)  Linux swap
> 
> /dev/hda10        Apple_UNIX_SVR2 /home          8388608 @ 16090304
>    (4.0G)  Linux Native
> 
> /dev/hda11            Apple_Free                28698128 @ 24478912
>   (13.7G)  Free space
> 
> Block size=512, Number of Blocks=53177040
> DeviceType=0x0, DeviceId=0x0
> Drivers-
> 1: @ 64 for 21, type=0x701
> 2: @ 118 for 34, type=0xf8ff
> 
> As you can see from this, the Linux partition now comes before any
> apple partitions on the disk. Booting debian, mounting the disk and
> running quik no longer produces the warning about a previous partition
> being bootable. 

That's good. I assume when you say booting debian here, you mean
booting the installer system...
 
> I'm getting very desparate here :( Any further advice (up to and
> including give it up - its never going to work) would be greatly
> appreciated here.
> 

I think you're getting closer. I can sympathize with your difficulty,
it took me 2 months to get Linux installed on my oldworld. It must
definitely be an oldworld since the installer told you it was running
quik. In OF, try

printenv

to see what it has listed for boot-device. the path should end with
:0 , if it ends with another number try 0 instead. 

quik will also boot an image directly, in OF try 

devalias

Pick out the alias that looks like ata something, that will be your
ide disk. Suppose it's ata0, try 

boot ata0:0/boot/vmlinux-2.2.19-pmac

(adding the path to the kernel on after the device and partition
designation). If :0 doesn't work here, then maybe the partition number
where you installed the root ata0:6 right? 

If you find the right combination, you can set your boot-device to
it. 

Also check your /target/etc/quik.conf to make sure it's pointing to
the right place, that your target/boot/vmlinux... is named like it
says it is. If it was created by the installer, it's probably OK.

When you get finished, there is no fancy boot menu for quik like there
is for yaboot. There's an OF script to produce one (STFW for Andi
Payne), but I find it's easier to just let it boot up to OF then type
either boot or bye.

-- 
*------v--------- Installing Debian GNU/Linux 3.0 --------v------*
|      <http://www.debian.org/releases/woody/installmanual>      |
|   debian-imac (potato): <http://debian-imac.sourceforge.net>   |
|            Chris Tillman        tillman@azstarnet.com          |
|                   May the Source be with you                   |
*----------------------------------------------------------------*



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