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Re: to DPL candidates: getting new people to Debian

On 17/03/13 at 14:54 +0100, Serafeim Zanikolas wrote:
> On Sat, Mar 16, 2013 at 04:28:03PM +0100, Lucas Nussbaum wrote [edited]:
> > On 16/03/13 at 15:31 +0100, Serafeim Zanikolas wrote:
> > > have
> > > you considered assignments for the preparation of patches for wishlist bugs in
> > > native and pseudo-packages (eg. infra-related sw projects)?
> > 
> > Have others thought about that/tried to organize such university
> > projects?
> There's this (master's, I think) module, ran by an academic who's a FreeBSD
> member, with goals amongst others:
> Appreciate and understand maintenance activities
> Be able to change existing systems
> http://www.dmst.aueb.gr/dds/ismr/intro/indexw.htm
> http://www.dmst.aueb.gr/dds/ismr/index.htm
> You can see in their "hall of fame" examples of successful contributions.

We are talking about two different things.

Your example is a course on Open Source Software Engineering. The
project's goal there is "have students discover the inner workings of a
Free Software project." Typically this is achieved by having the
students fix a few bugs, so that they have to understand all the
project's structure and procedure.
In that case, all the students following the course work on [possibly
different] Free Software projects.

I was thinking more of typical programming projects, where the goal is
"improve the students' C/Java/whatever skills, as well as their project
management skills". In that case, most of the students following the
course would develop yet another game from scratch, but the groups you
mentor would work on Debian.

My list of blockers apply to the second kind of projects. For example,
bug triaging or fixing does not work here, because you need students to
develop something sufficiently big so that coordination between students
becomes necessary.


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