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Re: Debian available as tarballs?



On Sun, Jun 22, 2003 at 04:38:22PM -0400, John Klos wrote:
> Hello,
> 
> I'd like to get a copy of the latest stable Debian files as tarball. I
> have found and downloaded base2_2.tgz, which seems like what I want, but I
> do not see one for anything newer.

There is none newer; newer installations use 'debootstrap', since that
deals with a few of the problems the original tarball method had (I'm
not really into this, so can't provide you with any details, sorry)

> Is there a reason for this? All of the docs about alternate methods of
> installation presume way too much: I neither care to use an x86 nor do I
> have physical access to the machine I'd like these files for. I simply
> wish to get an m68k Debian installation into a directory on a NetBSD
> machine.

The official way to 'cross' install a Debian system is by running
debootstrap. Since you're running on a different kernel, however, this
might be a bit of a chicken-and-egg problem, since as far as I
understand the binary Linux emulation under xBSD, your libc would need
to be installed first. Of course, you could download the source
archives, compile them on your NetBSD box, and run it; AIUI, debootstrap
is written to work on anything that even remotely resembles Unix.

A pretty good explanation of how this should be done can be found at
http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/ch-preparing.en.html#s-linux-upgrade 
(this assumes you already are running Linux, but that shouldn't matter
that much)

If that doesn't work, I suggest you download the 'basedebs.tar' file,
unpack it, and for every package in the archive, run

ar p foo.deb data.tar.gz | tar xvzf -

over it (replacing foo.deb with the 'right' filename, obviously). If the
GNU tools are way different from the NetBSD ones here: extract a file
called 'data.tar.gz' from the .deb (which really is an ar archive) and
extract whatever is in that file to your root-directory. This will give
you a fully functional Linux-system; however, it will not contain any
information on installed packages, or the like. If that matters to you,
you should reinstall all packages in the 'base' system.

-- 
Wouter Verhelst
Debian GNU/Linux -- http://www.debian.org
Nederlandstalige Linux-documentatie -- http://nl.linux.org
"An expert can usually spot the difference between a fake charge and a
full one, but there are plenty of dead experts." 
  -- National Geographic Channel, in a documentary about large African beasts.

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