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Re: Newbie question: Exim - trouble receiving incoming emails



On Wed January 10 2007 09:37, Duncan McDonald wrote:
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Andrew Sackville-West" <andrew@farwestbilliards.com>
> To: <debian-user@lists.debian.org>
> Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2007 3:33 AM
> Subject: Re: Newbie question: Exim - trouble receiving incoming emails
>
> > okay, so I had to try this to learn and
> >
> > andrew@basement:~$ dig +short bigpond.com mx
> > 10 extmail.bigpond.com.
> >
> > andrew@basement:~$ ping www.bigpond.com
> > PING www.bigpond.com (144.135.18.32) 56(84) bytes of data.
> > 64 bytes from 144.135.18.32: icmp_seq=1 ttl=233 time=212 ms
> >
> > cool, but...
> >
> > andrew@basement:~$ ping extmail.bigpond.com
> > PING extmail.bigpond.com (144.140.80.13) 56(84) bytes of data.
> > 64 bytes from extmail.bigpond.com (144.140.80.13): icmp_seq=1 ttl=234
> > time=364 ms
> >
> > that's a different IP. looks to me like the MX record is wrong.
> >
> > Am I doing that right?
> >
> > A
>
> Hi Andrew,
>
> Bigpond.com isn't my site, it's the ISP that I have registered my domain
> name with (ie encomium.com.au) and it seems to resolve fine via http, ssh
> and ping.
>
> Any email to <user>@encomium.com.au however gets the 'No server' message.
>
> All I'm really trying to figure out is whether my mail server settings are
> wrong or whether my ISP is redirecting my email traffic to force me to
> purchase extra mailboxes on their servers. Is it possible for a DNS
> provider to redirect traffic to a domain on a particular port (ie 25 and
> 110)?
>
> Also if they are redirecting my mail to an account on their servers, say
> blah@bigpond.com, would it be possible to set this account up as the
> primary mail repository? That is, if all email traffic for my site was
> directed into this account, would it be possible to set my server up to
> download the messages via POP, sort them by username, then forward them to
> the respective recipients?

It was a common practice in my area that ISP's would block ports like 25 so 
you couldn't run servers on a home account, or to prevent spam from 
originating on their IP block. I don't think that is the case now but that is 
something you may want to check. Telneting into your mail server on port 25 
may give you clues as to what is happening when an outside server tries to 
connect to your host.



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