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Re: data recovery / ext3 partition



on Fri, Feb 06, 2004 at 07:02:47PM +0200, ville virtanen (vvirtanen@luukku.com) wrote:
> Hello,

Hi.

Please set your mailer/editor linewrap to 68-75 characters.  I strongly
recommend 72 as a good default.

While many mail clients will accomodate unwrapped text:

  - Some don't.  Be considerate.

  - Many more fail to wrap and attribute quotes properly.

  - Many web-based list archives render unwrapped text as very long
    lines, e.g.:

    http://lists.debian.org/debian-devel/2003/debian-devel-200309/msg00568.html

Thank you.


> I tried to install Windows ME to a hard drive with an existing Debian
> system. During the install the system insisted on formatting drive
> "C", and since I had created an extra primary partition marked
> bootable to be "C" under Linux I figured why not. After reaching 100%
> the install said formatting failed and quit.
> 
> Fine, so I try to boot back to Linux but get the "No operating system"
> instead. Booting to Knoppix I found the partition table totally
> screwed up. I managed to get back /home and /usr partitions using
> gpart, but it seems the / partition has been partly overwritten.
> e2fsck gives the following:
> 
> root@ttyp3[knoppix]# e2fsck -n /dev/hda1
> e2fsck 1.34-WIP (21-May-2003)
> Couldn't find ext2 superblock, trying backup blocks...
> Superblock has a bad ext3 journal (inode 377).
> Clear? no
> 
> e2fsck: Illegal inode number while checking ext3 journal for /dev/hda1
> 
> Any ideas how to recover the partition? Or should I just wipe it,
> after all, the most important stuff (i.e. /home) seems to be safe?

From your backups, of course.

The ext3 filesystem doesn't support an "undo" or recovery feature.

Wipe.  Carefully.


Note that it's possible you've got valid data there, but your partition
table is inaccurate.  In which case, it's possible to reconstruct your
partition table and recover your data.  I've done this.  The trick is
that partitioning your disk doesn't actually change the data on it
(though creating a filesystem does).

I keep hardcopy printouts of my partition table bindered for all my
systems, to make this slightly easier than going from memory.


Peace.

-- 
Karsten M. Self <kmself@ix.netcom.com>        http://kmself.home.netcom.com/
 What Part of "Gestalt" don't you understand?
    Bush/Cheney '04: This time, elect us!

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