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Re: can't kill a PID



On Sun, Nov 03, 2002 at 12:42:59PM +0100, Elimar Riesebieter wrote:
> On Sun, 03 Nov 2002 the mental interface of 
> Kevin Coyner told:
> 
> > 
> > I always thought that with 'kill -9 PID' you could clean up just about
> > any process, but I've run into one that just won't go ...
> > 
> > sakura:~$ ps aux |grep xmms
> > kosuke    9026  0.0  0.9 14460 4932 ? D  00:16   0:00 xmms
> > kosuke    9027  0.0  0.0     0    0 ? Z  00:16   0:00 [xmms <defunct>] 
> > 
> > I've tried 'kill -9 9026 9027', but every time I go back and ps/grep it,
> > it's still there.  And in the meantime, if I try to start a new xmms, it
> > will start a new PID in addition to 9026, but the program itself won't
> > show up.

I'd say you have XMMS setup to only use one instance at a time.  It
should be possible to kill -9 9026 and let XMMS start up again, but 9027
is here to stay.  It's icky, but you could edit your ~/.xmms and change
the 

allow_multiple_instances=FALSE

line to 

allow_multiple_instances=TRUE

to let you start a new instance.  Maybe deleting the xmms_username.0
socket from /tmp would help as well.

> > Brainwashed from too many early years in the MS world, I'm tempted to
> > reboot.  But hoping there's a better, Linux way to clean this up.
> 
> killall -9 xmms
> 
> HTH

Won't work.  <defunct> processes are ones which have died, but the
kernel is keeping them around in case their parent cares about it's
return value.  AFAIK, it'll hang around, consuming no CPU time but some
amount of swap, until you reboot.

-rob

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