[Date Prev][Date Next] [Thread Prev][Thread Next] [Date Index] [Thread Index]

New Maintainers



This is a summary of the AM report for Week Ending 27 Feb 2005.
4 applicants became maintainers.

Volker Christian <voc>

   Thats really a long story! I got my first computer nearly 20 years ago. It was
   a Sinclair ZX-81 (1 KB-RAM :-). It was fun to play with it and to learn the 
   basic programming techniques.  My first contact with a computer language was 
   - of course - BASIC. But soon I also have tried to program this small thing 
   in machine language. Time goes on and my next computer was a Apple II
   (64 KB-RAM, 1 MHz 6502). The native language (built into the Apples ROM) was 
   again BASIC but I bought two floppy disc drives (160 KB each) which enables 
   me to learn and use Pascal and the assembler language supported by the Apple 
   Macro Assembler! I could tell you - this machine was really cool. 
   After this period i got my first IBM compatible 80286 with MS-DOS 3.3.  It was 
   a huge step forward concerning memory and speed but coding wasn't fun 
   anymore. And so i stopped coding until the early 1990s. I have just started 
   my physics studies. Physicists only use UNIX workstations for their work - 
   and so i had my first contact with that kind of operating system. I was 
   totally  fascinated about the concept of UNIX and C - I nearly couldn't stop 
   to investigate this system. Soon I heard about a free "UNIX" for ix86 
   architectures - Linux. I saw it at a friends computer and I quickly realized, 
   that this is the OS of my choice for my home PC. And coding suddenly was fun 
   again. During my studies i started to support "new media" artists with my 
   technical knowledge and my knowledge about linux. I realized many exciting 
   projects in this area with the Austrian broadcasting cooperation (ORF 
   (http://www.orf.at) and the Ars Electronica Center (http://www.aec.at) which 
   is one of the world leading new media centers. You can find further 
   informations about this projects on my present homepage 
   http://www.soft.uni-linz.ac.at/About_Us/Staff/Christian/index.php
   During the years i have tried to replace commercial software as far as 
   possible with open source software from my desktop. I found that in many 
   areas open source software is more reliable than commercial software and that 
   the concepts behind open source software are much more mature than those of 
   commercial software especially MS software. Around a year ago I noticed a 
   project called SynCE (http://synce.sourceforge.net/synce) which has the goal 
   to implement the "ActiveSync" protocol (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/
   default.asp?url=/library/en-us/wceactsy/html/ceoriActiveSync.asp) on linux. 
   Because this project only implements the low-level calls I found that it is 
   necessary to implement some user-level programs. So i started to code a 
   application based on KDE and SynCE which I called SynCE-KDE and which should 
   behave like ActiveSync. The reason that this is a piece of software which - i 
   belief - is helpful for some people and my political conviction to replace MS 
   software a widely as possible and third, that i got so much cool software 
   From the open software community i decided to give something back to the 
   community. Just now i am working with great effort on the SynCE-KDE
   (http://synce.sourceforge.net/synce/kde).

   But why Debian? I was a Slackware user since my early Linux days. But about a 
   year ago the last Slackware distribution 8.0 was terribly buggy that i 
   decided to look for an other distribution with fits in my needs and is 
   "compatible" with my political conviction. I have tried RedHat, SuSE, 
   Mandrake and some other - and also Debian. After some time using Debian
   I found, that i have missed something till now. It really satisfied me with 
   its package and release system. So Debian becomes MY new distribution.
   If you want to distribute software you also have to think how to do this. As i 
   am a Debian user it was natural for my to try to support also debian packages 
   of SynCE-KDE. That is also one of the main reasons why I want to become a 
   Debian Maintainer - I will be able to support the official debian packages of 
   SynCE-KDE by myself.
   Nevertheless, I also intent to package other peoples software for Debian.

   He maintains agsync, dynamite, kcemirror, libmimedir, librapi2, librra,
   libsynce, orange, synce-dccm, synce-kde, synce-multisync-plugin,
   synce-serial and unshield.


Neil McGovern <neilm>

   He maintains drivel.


Jay Berkenbilt <qjb>

   He maintains nip2 and vips7.10. He is also co-maintainer for
   libxml-xerces-perl, xerces23, xerces24, xerces25 and xerces26


Jeremy Lainé <sharky>

   I am a French / British binational and was born in The Netherlands. I
   have lived in The Netherlands, France, the US and Sweden, and enjoy
   the cultural diversity that comes with this sort of lifestyle! I am an
   engineer by training, more specifically in the field of
   telecommunications.
   [...]
   The more I got acquainted with the Free Software world, the more I was
   impressed by the thousands of people out there volunteering time and
   effort to develop software and provide support to the users. I have
   doing my best to give back what I can to the community. I wrote a
   kernel module and some utilities to support a portable MP3 player I
   use under Linux (http://mpf70.sourceforge.net/). I also helped my
   father rewrite in C++ a sail design package called Sailcut he has been
   writing for years and convinced him to make it Free Software
   (http://sailcut.sourceforge.net/). This project is very rewarding as
   it has an active user base of both professional and amateur users. I
   also maintain Diogenes, a content management system
   (http://opensource.polytechnique.org/diogenes/) which has been in the
   Debian Archive (package "diogenes") for a couple of months thanks to
   my sponsor Matthew Palmer.
   
   As far as contributing to Debian is concerned, I would like to start
   by packaging web-related applications and help improve existing ones.
   To this end I have submitted a number of patches for wwwconfig-common,
   which Ola Lundqvist recently applied and uploaded. I am also
   interested in helping mentoring potential new maintainers. Later on I
   would quite like to look into things such as the debian-installer as
   this has a big impact on how users experience Debian.

Attachment: pgpO8SOucgcSn.pgp
Description: PGP signature


Reply to: