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Re: apm on dell = kernel panic



On Wed, Aug 07, 2002 at 08:11:53AM +0100, Joss Winn wrote:
> Hello,
> 
> I'm using Debian 3.0 with the stock 2.4.15 deb kernel on a Dell
> Latitude XPi 133.  It's a great little console-only machine but for
> one problem.  On almost every occasion, 'apm -s' produces a kernel
> panic upon wake up and I have to hard reboot.  I get lots of
> messages on the console a couple of which are in English:
> 
> <1>Unable to handle kernel pagin request at virtual address dbdf5fdd
> printing eip
> 
> and...
> 
> <0>Kernel panic: Aiee, killing interrupt handler!
> In interrupt handler - not syncing
> 
> 
> does this make any sense to anyone?  I have attached my dmesg and
> lsmod output in case it might shed light on my set up.
> 
> Not being able to put a laptop to sleep is a real hassle. I'd
> appreciate any help.
> 
> thanks
> 
> Joss
> -- 

> Linux version 2.4.18-586tsc (herbert@gondolin) (gcc version 2.95.4 20011002 (Debian prerelease)) #1 Sun Apr 14 10:57:57 EST 2002
. . .
> No local APIC present or hardware disabled
> Kernel command line: BOOT_IMAGE=Linux ro root=302
> Initializing CPU#0
> Detected 133.639 MHz processor.
> Console: colour VGA+ 80x25
> Calibrating delay loop... 266.24 BogoMIPS
> Memory: 67984k/73728k available (810k kernel code, 5360k reserved, 229k data, 212k init, 0k highmem)

Hmm, not exactly the heftiest machine.  Linux won't mind, and it
suggests that it may be old enough, probably you do not have the option
to back off to ACPI.

(on more modern hardware ACPI often works better, or works as well as
can be expected, APM not having been tested by the hardware folks worth
a #*! ... sigh.)

. . .
> apm: BIOS version 1.1 Flags 0x03 (Driver version 1.16)

well, it spotted this, so you probably don't have to force 
	append="apm=on"

Unfortunately that's bad news;  it means it'll be giving it a shot, but
trying obviously gives your poor beastie indigestion.

The next thing I'd suggest is chekcing your CMOS/BIOS entries and see if
any of them affect how APM behaves.  e.g. if APM is turned off there, or
something wacky like that.  

> Module                  Size  Used by    Not tainted
> nfs                    69628   1  (autoclean)
> ipt_TOS                 1024   0  (autoclean)
> ipt_REJECT              2816   0  (autoclean)
> ipt_state                608   0  (autoclean)
> iptable_mangle          2144   0  (autoclean)
> ip_nat_irc              2336   0  (unused)
> ip_nat_ftp              2944   0  (unused)
> iptable_nat            12980   2  [ip_nat_irc ip_nat_ftp]
> ip_conntrack_irc        2496   0  (unused)
> ip_conntrack_ftp        3232   0  (unused)
> ip_conntrack           12940   4  [ipt_state ip_nat_irc ip_nat_ftp iptable_nat ip_conntrack_irc ip_conntrack_ftp]
> iptable_filter          1728   1  (autoclean)
> ip_tables              10528   8  [ipt_TOS ipt_REJECT ipt_state iptable_mangle iptable_nat iptable_filter]
> nfsd                   65024   8  (autoclean)
> lockd                  46816   1  (autoclean) [nfs nfsd]
> sunrpc                 58484   1  (autoclean) [nfs nfsd lockd]
> lp                      6368   1  (autoclean)
> apm                     8956   1  (autoclean)

I've seen it occasionally that modular APM works poorly for people; you
might try building you own kernel with the feature as a built-in.

You might also try the 2.2.20 kernel.  Maybe the ipchains isn't as
spiffy, but the defenses are alright, and there are lots of apps to help
you concoct ipchains.

> xirc2ps_cs             11492   1 
> serial_cs               4448   0  (unused)
> ds                      6464   2  [xirc2ps_cs serial_cs]
> i82365                 12608   2 
> pcmcia_core            39136   0  [xirc2ps_cs serial_cs ds i82365]
> isa-pnp                28168   0  [i82365]
> parport_pc             22056   2  (autoclean)

Your call whether to build this in, but parport and parport_pc go
together.  It's not like your parallel port *itself* is going to detach
and walk away.  OTOH you're pretty tight on memory.

> pcd                    11072   0  (unused)
> cdrom                  27488   0  [pcd]
> bpck                    8800   1 
> paride                  3488   1  [pcd bpck]
> parport                22976   2  [lp parport_pc paride]
> rtc                     5528   0  (autoclean)
> unix                   13316   8  (autoclean)
> ide-disk                6624   2  (autoclean)
> ide-probe-mod           8064   0  (autoclean)
> ide-mod               130860   2  (autoclean) [ide-disk ide-probe-mod]

shouldn't IDE be built-in?   Oh that's right.  This is an initrd kernel.

> ext2                   30592   0  (autoclean) (unused)
> ext3                   56736   1  (autoclean)
> jbd                    35048   1  (autoclean) [ext3]

Notice how chubby ext3 is, and jbd using it.   

Note that ext3 support on 2.2.x is going to need that support builtin.
You may very well have to build your own to do that so you can choose
your lesser processor.

don't be afraid to 
	apt-get -b source [packagename]

instead of just rush to install a kernel image.  Luckily, installing a
new kernel image does not remove an old one.


* Heather Stern * star@ many places...



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