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D-I Manual - Making entities translatable



This subject has been discussed before [1] and the needed changes have 
even been sitting uncommitted in my local checkout for quite some time, 
but until now I've never been happy enough to actually commit it.
But the time has finally come to go ahead.

The attached README gives an explanation of the possibilities this change 
offers and an instruction for translators.

The patch build.diff contains the needed technical changes.
The changes in the definitions of entities have been done in such a way 
that current entities are still supported.
See nl.po in that patch for an example how translated entities could look.

The patch en.diff contains changes generated by a script I've written 
needed to switch from "old entities" to "new entities".
It also replaces some text that is currently fixed: "Debian Installer" and 
"Debian installer" both become "&D-I;". Otherwise effectively nothing 
changes in the generated manual.

A few changes in this patch may need to be reverted later or will be 
changed to a different entity later.
For example a lot of "&release-tech;" should eventually be changed to 
"&release-name;". Also, evenually I'd like to change most current "&d-i;" 
occurrences by "&D-I;".

REQUEST FOR REVIEW
==================
I'd very much appreciate if you would spend some time thinking about this 
change and how it could be used for your language. Please read the 
earlier discussion [1] and the attached README file first.

I'd also appreciate comments on the proposed entity names and on the 
changes in the en.diff patch. Please also try to judge if the same 
changes can be made without problem for your translation.

I've been considering introducing an extra entity:
   &D-I-gen; => "Debian Installer's" (-gen for genitive)
Would that entity also be useful for translations?

In the end I've been quite conservative with the initial changes in the 
en.diff. Originally I had also planned to replace "Debian" by "&distr;" 
automatically. However, that would result in less desirable changes in 
too many places, so I decided to do those manually at some later time.

I'd also appreciate feedback from Colin if this will really help him for 
Ubuntu. Of course, the real benefit will only start after additional 
manual conversions have been done as well.

TRANSITION PLAN
===============
1. Commit the changes in build.diff and the README.
2. Update documentation for translators on alioth.

After that the conversion of existing entities needs to be done (changes 
in en.diff). To minimize work for translators, I'd suggest that:
- translators should try to make sure they are up-to-date before the
  conversion to avoid mixing these changes with other updates
- automatically convert PO files at the same time to avoid fuzzies;
  translators should check the resulting diff in detail though
- for XML based translations there are three options:
  - automatic conversion by me using the script
  - automatic conversion by the translator using the script
  - manual conversion by the translator
  I'd personally suggest the second option; I will make the script
  available of course.

After about a week or two after the automatic conversion, the corrections 
and additional manual changes could start. This will result in a lot of 
minor changes all through the manual.

Cheers,
FJP

[1] http://lists.debian.org/debian-boot/2004/12/msg00973.html
Index: howto/installation-howto.xml
===================================================================
--- howto/installation-howto.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ howto/installation-howto.xml	(working copy)
@@ -6,12 +6,12 @@
 
 <para>
 
-This document describes how to install &debian; &releasename; for
+This document describes how to install &distr-full; &release-tech; for
 the &arch-title; (<quote>&architecture;</quote>) with the
 new &d-i;. It is a quick walkthrough of the installation process
 which should contain all the information you will need for most installs.
 When more information can be useful, we will link to more detailed
-explanations in the <link linkend="debian_installation_guide">&debian;
+explanations in the <link linkend="debian_installation_guide">&distr-full;
 Installation Guide</link>.
 
 </para>
@@ -68,7 +68,7 @@
 <para>
 
 There are two different netinst CD images which can be used to install
-&releasename; with the &d-i;. These images are intended to boot from CD
+&release-tech; with the &d-i;. These images are intended to boot from CD
 and install additional packages over a network, hence the name 'netinst'.
 The difference between the two images is that on the full netinst image
 the base packages are included, whereas you have to download these from
Index: preface.xml
===================================================================
--- preface.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ preface.xml	(working copy)
@@ -2,12 +2,12 @@
 <!-- $Id$ -->
 
 <preface>
- <title>Installing &debian; &release; For &architecture;</title>
+ <title>Installing &distr-full; &release-version; For &architecture;</title>
 <para>
 
 We are delighted that you have decided to try Debian, and are
 sure that you will find that Debian's GNU/Linux distribution is
-unique. &debian; brings together high-quality free software
+unique. &distr-full; brings together high-quality free software
 from around the world, integrating it into a coherent whole. We
 believe that you will find that the result is truly more than the sum
 of the parts.
@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@
 </para><para>
 
 We understand that many of you want to install Debian without reading this
-manual, and the Debian installer is designed to make this possible. If you
+manual, and the &D-I; is designed to make this possible. If you
 don't have time to read the whole Installation Guide right now, we recommend
 that you read the Installation Howto, which will walk you through the basic
 installation process, and links to the manual for more advanced topics or
Index: bookinfo.xml
===================================================================
--- bookinfo.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ bookinfo.xml	(working copy)
@@ -2,12 +2,12 @@
 <!-- $Id$ -->
 
 <bookinfo id="debian_installation_guide">
-<title>&debian; Installation Guide</title>
+<title>&distr-full; Installation Guide</title>
 
 <abstract>
 <para>
-This document contains installation instructions for the &debian;
-&release; system (codename <quote>&releasename;</quote>),
+This document contains installation instructions for the &distr-full;
+&release-version; system (codename <quote>&release-tech;</quote>),
 for the &arch-title; (<quote>&architecture;</quote>)
 architecture.  It also contains pointers to more information and
 information on how to make the most of your new Debian system.
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@
 <warning condition="not-checked"><para>
 This installation guide is based on an earlier manual written for
 the old Debian installation system (the <quote>boot-floppies</quote>), and has
-been updated to document the new Debian installer. However, for
+been updated to document the new &D-I;. However, for
 &architecture;, the manual has not been fully updated and fact checked
 for the new installer. There may remain parts of the manual that are
 incomplete or outdated or that still document the boot-floppies
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@
 <note condition="checked"><para>
 Although this installation guide for &architecture; is mostly up-to-date,
 we plan to make some changes and reorganize parts of the manual after the
-official release of &releasename;. A newer version of this manual may be
+official release of &release-tech;. A newer version of this manual may be
 found on the Internet at the <ulink url="&url-d-i;">&d-i; home page</ulink>.
 You may also be able to find additional translations there.
 </para></note>
@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@
  <year>2004</year>
  <year>2005</year>
  <year>2006</year>
- <holder>the Debian Installer team</holder>
+ <holder>the &D-I; team</holder>
 </copyright>
 
 <legalnotice>
Index: install-methods/install-tftp.xml
===================================================================
--- install-methods/install-tftp.xml	(revision 36841)
+++ install-methods/install-tftp.xml	(working copy)
@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@
 
 To use the Pre-boot Execution Environment (PXE) method of TFTP
 booting, you will need a TFTP server with <userinput>tsize</userinput>
-support.  On a &debian; server, the <classname>atftpd</classname> and
+support.  On a &distr-full; server, the <classname>atftpd</classname> and
 <classname>tftpd-hpa</classname> packages qualify; we recommend
 <classname>tftpd-hpa</classname>.
 
Index: install-methods/downloading-files.xml
===================================================================
--- install-methods/downloading-files.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ install-methods/downloading-files.xml	(working copy)
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@
 
 <para>
 The installation images are located on each Debian mirror in the directory
-<ulink url="&url-debian-installer;/images">debian/dists/&releasename;/main/installer-&architecture;/current/images/</ulink>
+<ulink url="&url-debian-installer;/images">debian/dists/&release-tech;/main/installer-&architecture;/current/images/</ulink>
 &mdash; the <ulink url="&url-debian-installer;/images/MANIFEST">MANIFEST</ulink>
 lists each image and its purpose.
 </para>
Index: install-methods/download/arm.xml
===================================================================
--- install-methods/download/arm.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ install-methods/download/arm.xml	(working copy)
@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@
 <para>
 
 A firmware image is provided for the Linksys NSLU2 which will automatically
-boot <classname>debian-installer</classname>.  This firmware image can be
+boot &d-i;.  This firmware image can be
 obtained from &nslu2-firmware-img;.
 
 </para>
Index: install-methods/floppy/powerpc.xml
===================================================================
--- install-methods/floppy/powerpc.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ install-methods/floppy/powerpc.xml	(working copy)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@
 <para>
 
 If you are creating the floppy image from files which were originally
-on the official &debian; CD, then the Type and Creator are already set
+on the official &distr-full; CD, then the Type and Creator are already set
 correctly. The following <command>Creator-Changer</command> steps are
 only necessary if you downloaded the image files from a Debian mirror.
 
Index: install-methods/automatic-install.xml
===================================================================
--- install-methods/automatic-install.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ install-methods/automatic-install.xml	(working copy)
@@ -11,15 +11,15 @@
 <classname>replicator</classname>,
 <classname>systemimager</classname>,
 <classname>autoinstall</classname>, and
-the Debian Installer itself.
+the &D-I; itself.
 
 </para>
 
   <sect2 id="preseed">
-  <title>Automatic Installation Using the Debian Installer</title>
+  <title>Automatic Installation Using the &D-I;</title>
 <para>
 
-The Debian Installer supports automating installs via preconfiguration
+The &D-I; supports automating installs via preconfiguration
 files. A preconfiguration file can be loaded from the network or from
 removable media, and used to fill in answers to questions asked during the
 installation process.
Index: install-methods/tftp/bootp.xml
===================================================================
--- install-methods/tftp/bootp.xml	(revision 36841)
+++ install-methods/tftp/bootp.xml	(working copy)
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@
 
 There are two BOOTP servers available for GNU/Linux. The first is CMU
 <command>bootpd</command>. The other is actually a DHCP server: ISC
-<command>dhcpd</command>. In &debian; these are contained in the
+<command>dhcpd</command>. In &distr-full; these are contained in the
 <classname>bootp</classname> and <classname>dhcp</classname> packages
 respectively.
 
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@
 
 To use CMU <command>bootpd</command>, you must first uncomment (or
 add) the relevant line in <filename>/etc/inetd.conf</filename>.  On
-&debian;, you can run <userinput>update-inetd --enable
+&distr-full;, you can run <userinput>update-inetd --enable
 bootps</userinput>, then <userinput>/etc/init.d/inetd
 reload</userinput> to do so. Just in case your BOOTP server does not
 run Debian, the line in question should look like:
Index: install-methods/tftp/dhcp.xml
===================================================================
--- install-methods/tftp/dhcp.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ install-methods/tftp/dhcp.xml	(working copy)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
 <para>
 
 One free software DHCP server is ISC <command>dhcpd</command>.
-In &debian;, this is available in the <classname>dhcp</classname> package.
+In &distr-full;, this is available in the <classname>dhcp</classname> package.
 Here is a sample configuration file for it (usually
 <filename>/etc/dhcpd.conf</filename>):
 
Index: install-methods/official-cdrom.xml
===================================================================
--- install-methods/official-cdrom.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ install-methods/official-cdrom.xml	(working copy)
@@ -2,10 +2,10 @@
 <!-- $Id$ -->
 
  <sect1 id="official-cdrom">
- <title>Official &debian; CD-ROM Sets</title>
+ <title>Official &distr-full; CD-ROM Sets</title>
 <para>
 
-By far the easiest way to install &debian; is from an Official
+By far the easiest way to install &distr-full; is from an Official
 Debian CD-ROM Set. You can buy a set from a vendor (see the
 <ulink url="&url-debian-cd-vendors;">CD vendors page</ulink>).
 You may also download the CD-ROM images from a Debian mirror and make
Index: partitioning/partition/alpha.xml
===================================================================
--- partitioning/partition/alpha.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ partitioning/partition/alpha.xml	(working copy)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
 <para>
 
 Booting Debian from the SRM console (the only disk boot method supported
-by &releasename;) requires you to have a BSD disk label, not a DOS
+by &release-tech;) requires you to have a BSD disk label, not a DOS
 partition table, on your boot disk.  (Remember, the SRM boot block is
 incompatible with MS-DOS partition tables &mdash; see
 <xref linkend="alpha-firmware"/>.)  As a result, <command>partman</command>
Index: partitioning/partition/i386.xml
===================================================================
--- partitioning/partition/i386.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ partitioning/partition/i386.xml	(working copy)
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@
 Linux limits the partitions per drive to 15 partitions for SCSI disks
 (3 usable primary partitions, 12 logical partitions), and 63
 partitions on an IDE drive (3 usable primary partitions, 60 logical
-partitions). However the normal &debian; system provides
+partitions). However the normal &distr-full; system provides
 only 20 devices for partitions, so you may not install on partitions
 higher than 20 unless you first manually create devices for those
 partitions.
Index: partitioning/partition/powerpc.xml
===================================================================
--- partitioning/partition/powerpc.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ partitioning/partition/powerpc.xml	(working copy)
@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@
 
 </para><para>
 
-In order for OpenFirmware to automatically boot &debian; the bootstrap
+In order for OpenFirmware to automatically boot &distr-full; the bootstrap
 partition should appear before other boot partitions on the disk,
 especially MacOS boot partitions.  The bootstrap partition should be
 the first one you create. However, if you add a bootstrap partition
Index: partitioning/tree.xml
===================================================================
--- partitioning/tree.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ partitioning/tree.xml	(working copy)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
  <title>The Directory Tree</title>
 <para>
 
-&debian; adheres to the
+&distr-full; adheres to the
 <ulink url="&url-fhs-home;">Filesystem Hierarchy Standard</ulink>
 for directory and file naming. This standard allows users and software
 programs to predict the location of files and directories. The root
Index: preparing/pre-install-bios-setup.xml
===================================================================
--- preparing/pre-install-bios-setup.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ preparing/pre-install-bios-setup.xml	(working copy)
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 your system.  The <quote>firmware</quote> is the core software used by the
 hardware; it is most critically invoked during the bootstrap process
 (after power-up). Known hardware issues affecting the reliability of
-&debian; on your system are also highlighted.
+&distr-full; on your system are also highlighted.
 
 </para>
 
Index: preparing/backup.xml
===================================================================
--- preparing/backup.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ preparing/backup.xml	(working copy)
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@
 Before you start, make sure to back up every file that is now on your
 system. If this is the first time a non-native operating system has
 been installed on your computer, it's quite likely you will need to
-re-partition your disk to make room for &debian;. Anytime you
+re-partition your disk to make room for &distr-full;. Anytime you
 partition your disk, you should count on losing everything on the
 disk, no matter what program you use to do it. The programs used in
 installation are quite reliable and most have seen years of use; but
Index: preparing/preparing.xml
===================================================================
--- preparing/preparing.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ preparing/preparing.xml	(working copy)
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
 <!-- $Id$ -->
 
 <chapter id="preparing">
- <title>Before Installing &debian;</title>
+ <title>Before Installing &distr-full;</title>
 <para>
 
 This chapter deals with the preparation for installing Debian before you even
Index: preparing/nondeb-part/alpha.xml
===================================================================
--- preparing/nondeb-part/alpha.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ preparing/nondeb-part/alpha.xml	(working copy)
@@ -75,7 +75,7 @@
 If you plan to boot Linux from an ARC/AlphaBIOS/ARCSBIOS console, you
 will need a (small) FAT partition for MILO.  5 MB is quite
 sufficient.  If Windows NT is installed, its 6 MB bootstrap partition
-can be employed for this purpose.  Debian &releasename; does not support
+can be employed for this purpose.  Debian &release-tech; does not support
 installing MILO.  If you already have MILO installed on your system, or
 install MILO from other media, Debian can still be booted from ARC.
 
Index: preparing/nondeb-part/powerpc.xml
===================================================================
--- preparing/nondeb-part/powerpc.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ preparing/nondeb-part/powerpc.xml	(working copy)
@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@
 
 Remember to create a placeholder partition for GNU/Linux, preferably
 positioned first in the disk layout. it doesn't matter what type it
-is, it will be deleted and replaced later inside the &debian; installer.
+is, it will be deleted and replaced later inside the &distr-full; installer.
 
 </para><para>
 
Index: preparing/install-overview.xml
===================================================================
--- preparing/install-overview.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ preparing/install-overview.xml	(working copy)
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@
 
 </para><para>
 
-Under &debian;, it is much more likely that your OS can be repaired
+Under &distr-full;, it is much more likely that your OS can be repaired
 rather than replaced if things go wrong. Upgrades never require a
 wholesale installation; you can always upgrade in-place. And the
 programs are almost always compatible with successive OS releases.  If
@@ -114,7 +114,7 @@
 <listitem><para>
 
 Install a <firstterm>boot loader</firstterm>
-which can start up &debian; and/or your existing system.
+which can start up &distr-full; and/or your existing system.
 
 </para></listitem>
 <listitem><para>
@@ -132,12 +132,12 @@
 
 </para><para>
 
-The installer software, <classname>debian-installer</classname>, is
+The installer software, &d-i;, is
 the primary concern of this manual. It detects hardware and loads
 appropriate drivers, uses <classname>dhcp-client</classname> to set up the
 network connection, and runs <classname>debootstrap</classname> to install
 the base system packages. Many more actors play smaller parts in this process,
-but <classname>debian-installer</classname> has completed its task when
+but &d-i; has completed its task when
 you load the new system for the first time.
 
 </para><para>
@@ -148,17 +148,17 @@
 
 </para><para>
 
-When <classname>debian-installer</classname> finishes, before the
+When &d-i; finishes, before the
 first system load, you have only a very basic command line driven
 system. The graphical interface which displays windows on your monitor
 will not be installed unless you select it with <classname>tasksel</classname>.
-It's optional because many &debian; systems are servers which don't really
+It's optional because many &distr-full; systems are servers which don't really
 have any need for a graphical user interface to do their job.
 
 </para><para arch="not-s390">
 
 Just be aware that the X system is completely separate from
-<classname>debian-installer</classname>, and in fact is much more
+&d-i;, and in fact is much more
 complicated. Installation and trouble shooting of the X window
 installation is not within the scope of this manual.
 
Index: preparing/bios-setup/s390.xml
===================================================================
--- preparing/bios-setup/s390.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ preparing/bios-setup/s390.xml	(working copy)
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
   <sect2 arch="s390"><title>BIOS Setup</title>
 <para>
 
-In order to install &debian; on a &arch-title; or zSeries
+In order to install &distr-full; on a &arch-title; or zSeries
 machine you have first boot a kernel into the system.  The boot
 mechanism of this platform is inherently different to other ones,
 especially from PC-like systems: there are no floppy devices available
@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@
 </para><para>
 
 The installation server needs to copy the exact directory structure
-from any &debian; mirror, but only the s390 and
+from any &distr-full; mirror, but only the s390 and
 architecture-independent files are required. You can also copy the
 contents of all installation CDs into such a directory tree.
 
Index: preparing/needed-info.xml
===================================================================
--- preparing/needed-info.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ preparing/needed-info.xml	(working copy)
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@
 <para condition="for_wdo">
 
 The document you are now reading, which is the official version of the
-Installation Guide for the &releasename; release of Debian; available
+Installation Guide for the &release-tech; release of Debian; available
 in <ulink url="&url-release-area;/installmanual">various formats and
 translations</ulink>.
 
Index: preparing/non-debian-partitioning.xml
===================================================================
--- preparing/non-debian-partitioning.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ preparing/non-debian-partitioning.xml	(working copy)
@@ -75,7 +75,7 @@
 </para><para>
 
 If your machine has only one hard disk, and you would like to
-completely replace the current operating system with &debian;,
+completely replace the current operating system with &distr-full;,
 you also can wait to partition as part of the installation process
 (<xref linkend="partman"/>), after you have booted the
 installation system.  However this only works if you plan to boot the
@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@
 
 If your machine already has multiple partitions, and enough space can
 be provided by deleting and replacing one or more of them, then you
-too can wait and use the Debian installer's partitioning program. You
+too can wait and use the &D-I;'s partitioning program. You
 should still read through the material below, because there may be
 special circumstances like the order of the existing partitions within
 the partition map, that force you to partition before installing
@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@
 </para><para arch="i386">
 
 If your machine has a FAT or NTFS filesystem, as used by DOS and Windows,
-you can wait and use Debian installer's partitioning program to
+you can wait and use &D-I;'s partitioning program to
 resize the filesystem.
 
 </para><para>
@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@
 Debian. If some of the partitions will be owned by other operating
 systems, you should create those partitions using native operating
 system partitioning programs. We recommend that you do
-<emphasis>not</emphasis> attempt to create partitions for &debian;
+<emphasis>not</emphasis> attempt to create partitions for &distr-full;
 using another operating system's tools. Instead, you should just
 create the native operating system's partitions you will want to
 retain.
@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@
 
 </para><para arch="powerpc">
 
-In order for OpenFirmware to automatically boot &debian; the Linux
+In order for OpenFirmware to automatically boot &distr-full; the Linux
 partitions should appear before all other partitions on the disk,
 especially MacOS boot partitions. This should be kept in mind when
 pre-partitioning; you should create a Linux placeholder partition to
@@ -166,7 +166,7 @@
 
 Use the native partitioning tools to create native system
 partition(s). Leave either a place holder partition or free space for
-&debian;.
+&distr-full;.
 
 </para></listitem>
 <listitem><para>
@@ -177,12 +177,12 @@
 <listitem><para>
 
 Boot back into the native system to verify everything's OK,
-    and to download the Debian installer boot files.
+    and to download the &D-I; boot files.
 
 </para></listitem>
 <listitem><para>
 
-Boot the Debian installer to continue installing Debian.
+Boot the &D-I; to continue installing Debian.
 
 </para></listitem>
 </orderedlist>
Index: appendix/chroot-install.xml
===================================================================
--- appendix/chroot-install.xml	(revision 36854)
+++ appendix/chroot-install.xml	(working copy)
@@ -2,14 +2,14 @@
 <!-- $Id$ -->
 
  <sect1 id="linux-upgrade">
- <title>Installing &debian; from a Unix/Linux System</title>
+ <title>Installing &distr-full; from a Unix/Linux System</title>
 
 <para>
 
-This section explains how to install &debian; from an existing
+This section explains how to install &distr-full; from an existing
 Unix or Linux system, without using the menu-driven installer as
 explained in the rest of the manual. This <quote>cross-install</quote>
-HOWTO has been requested by users switching to &debian; from
+HOWTO has been requested by users switching to &distr-full; from
 Red Hat, Mandrake, and SUSE. In this section some familiarity with
 entering *nix commands and navigating the file system is assumed. In
 this section, <prompt>$</prompt> symbolizes a command to be entered in
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@
 
 Once you've got the new Debian system configured to your preference,
 you can migrate your existing user data (if any) to it, and keep on
-rolling. This is therefore a <quote>zero downtime</quote> &debian;
+rolling. This is therefore a <quote>zero downtime</quote> &distr-full;
 install. It's also a clever way for dealing with hardware that
 otherwise doesn't play friendly with various boot or installation
 media.
@@ -83,7 +83,7 @@
   <title>Install <command>debootstrap</command></title>
 <para>
 
-The tool that the Debian installer uses, which is recognized as the
+The tool that the &D-I; uses, which is recognized as the
 official way to install a Debian base system, is
 <command>debootstrap</command>. It uses <command>wget</command> and
 <command>ar</command>, but otherwise depends only on
@@ -158,7 +158,7 @@
 
 </para><para>
 
-If you have a &releasename; &debian; CD mounted at
+If you have a &release-tech; &distr-full; CD mounted at
 <filename>/cdrom</filename>, you could substitute a file URL instead
 of the http URL: <userinput>file:/cdrom/debian/</userinput>
 
@@ -180,7 +180,7 @@
 <userinput>sparc</userinput>.
 
 <informalexample><screen>
-# /usr/sbin/debootstrap --arch ARCH &releasename; \
+# /usr/sbin/debootstrap --arch ARCH &release-tech; \
      /mnt/debinst http://http.us.debian.org/debian
 </screen></informalexample>
 
@@ -397,7 +397,7 @@
 <title>Set up the Boot Loader</title>
 <para>
 
-To make your &debian; system bootable, set up your boot loader to load
+To make your &distr-full; system bootable, set up your boot loader to load
 the installed kernel with your new root partition. Note that debootstrap
 does not install a boot loader, though you can use apt-get inside your
 Debian chroot to do so.
Index: appendix/plip.xml
===================================================================
--- appendix/plip.xml	(revision 36854)
+++ appendix/plip.xml	(working copy)
@@ -2,11 +2,11 @@
 <!-- $Id$ -->
 
  <sect1 id="plip" arch="i386">
- <title>Installing &debian; over Parallel Line IP (PLIP)</title>
+ <title>Installing &distr-full; over Parallel Line IP (PLIP)</title>
 
 <para>
 
-This section explains how to install &debian; on a computer without
+This section explains how to install &distr-full; on a computer without
 Ethernet card, but with just a remote gateway computer attached via
 a Null-Modem cable (also called Null-Printer cable). The gateway
 computer should be connected to a network that has a Debian mirror
Index: post-install/reactivating-win.xml
===================================================================
--- post-install/reactivating-win.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ post-install/reactivating-win.xml	(working copy)
@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@
 
 </para><para>
 
-Notice that there are other boot loaders available in &debian;, such as
+Notice that there are other boot loaders available in &distr-full;, such as
 GRUB (in <classname>grub</classname> package),
 CHOS (in <classname>chos</classname> package),
 Extended-IPL (in <classname>extipl</classname> package),
Index: boot-new/boot-new.xml
===================================================================
--- boot-new/boot-new.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ boot-new/boot-new.xml	(working copy)
@@ -148,7 +148,7 @@
 
 On G4 machines and iBooks, you can hold down the
 <keycap>option</keycap> key and get a graphical screen with a button
-for each bootable OS, &debian; will be a button with a small penguin
+for each bootable OS, &distr-full; will be a button with a small penguin
 icon.
 
 </para><para>
@@ -168,15 +168,15 @@
 </para><para>
 
 Resetting OpenFirmware on G3 or G4 hardware will cause it to boot
-&debian; by default (if you correctly partitioned and placed the
-Apple_Bootstrap partition first).  If you have &debian; on a SCSI disk
+&distr-full; by default (if you correctly partitioned and placed the
+Apple_Bootstrap partition first).  If you have &distr-full; on a SCSI disk
 and MacOS on an IDE disk this may not work and you will have to enter
 OpenFirmware and set the <envar>boot-device</envar> variable,
 <command>ybin</command> normally does this automatically.
 
 </para><para>
 
-After you boot &debian; for the first time you can add any additional
+After you boot &distr-full; for the first time you can add any additional
 options you desire (such as dual boot options) to
 <filename>/etc/yaboot.conf</filename> and run <command>ybin</command>
 to update your boot partition with the changed configuration.  Please
Index: welcome/doc-organization.xml
===================================================================
--- welcome/doc-organization.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ welcome/doc-organization.xml	(working copy)
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@
 
 In general, this manual is arranged in a linear fashion, walking you
 through the installation process from start to finish.  Here are the
-steps in installing &debian;, and the sections of this document which
+steps in installing &distr-full;, and the sections of this document which
 correlate with each step:
 
 <orderedlist>
Index: welcome/getting-newest-doc.xml
===================================================================
--- welcome/getting-newest-doc.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ welcome/getting-newest-doc.xml	(working copy)
@@ -8,8 +8,8 @@
 
 This document is constantly being revised.  Be sure to check the
 <ulink url="&url-release-area;">
-Debian &release; pages</ulink> for any last-minute information about
-the &release; release of the &debian; system.  Updated versions of
+Debian &release-version; pages</ulink> for any last-minute information about
+the &release-version; release of the &distr-full; system.  Updated versions of
 this installation manual are also available from the
 <ulink url="&url-install-manual;">official Install Manual pages</ulink>.
 
Index: welcome/what-is-debian-linux.xml
===================================================================
--- welcome/what-is-debian-linux.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ welcome/what-is-debian-linux.xml	(working copy)
@@ -2,12 +2,12 @@
 <!-- $Id$ -->
 
  <sect1 id="what-is-debian-linux">
- <title>What is &debian;?</title>
+ <title>What is &distr-full;?</title>
 <para>
 
 The combination of Debian's philosophy and methodology and the GNU
 tools, the Linux kernel, and other important free software, form a
-unique software distribution called &debian;. This
+unique software distribution called &distr-full;. This
 distribution is made up of a large number of software
 <emphasis>packages</emphasis>.  Each package in the distribution
 contains executables, scripts, documentation, and configuration
@@ -68,7 +68,7 @@
 
 </para><para>
 
-The primary, and best, method of getting support for your &debian;
+The primary, and best, method of getting support for your &distr-full;
 system and communicating with Debian Developers is through
 the many mailing lists maintained by the Debian Project (there are
 more than &num-of-debian-maillists; at this writing).  The easiest
Index: welcome/welcome.xml
===================================================================
--- welcome/welcome.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ welcome/welcome.xml	(working copy)
@@ -5,8 +5,8 @@
 <para>
 
 This chapter provides an overview of the Debian Project and
-&debian;. If you already know about the Debian Project's
-history and the &debian; distribution, feel free to skip to
+&distr-full;. If you already know about the Debian Project's
+history and the &distr-full; distribution, feel free to skip to
 the next chapter.
 
 </para>
Index: welcome/getting-newest-inst.xml
===================================================================
--- welcome/getting-newest-inst.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ welcome/getting-newest-inst.xml	(working copy)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
 
 <para>
 
-For information on how to download &debian; from the Internet
+For information on how to download &distr-full; from the Internet
 or from whom official Debian CDs can be purchased, see the
 <ulink url="&url-debian-distrib;">distribution web page</ulink>.
 The <ulink url="&url-debian-mirrors;">list of Debian mirrors</ulink>
Index: using-d-i/components.xml
===================================================================
--- using-d-i/components.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ using-d-i/components.xml	(working copy)
@@ -15,10 +15,10 @@
 </para>
 
   <sect2 id="di-setup">
-  <title>Setting up Debian Installer and Hardware Configuration</title>
+  <title>Setting up &D-I; and Hardware Configuration</title>
 <para>
 
-Let's assume the Debian Installer has booted and you are facing its
+Let's assume the &D-I; has booted and you are facing its
 first screen.  At this time, the capabilities of &d-i; are still quite
 limited. It doesn't know much about your hardware, preferred language,
 or even the task it should perform. Don't worry. Because &d-i; is quite
Index: using-d-i/modules/powerpc/yaboot-installer.xml
===================================================================
--- using-d-i/modules/powerpc/yaboot-installer.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ using-d-i/modules/powerpc/yaboot-installer.xml	(working copy)
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
 <quote>bootstrap</quote> with type
 <emphasis>Apple_Bootstrap</emphasis> created back in the partitioning
 component.  If this step completes successfully then your disk should
-now be bootable and OpenFirmware will be set to boot &debian;.
+now be bootable and OpenFirmware will be set to boot &distr-full;.
 
 </para>
   </sect3>
Index: using-d-i/modules/lowmem.xml
===================================================================
--- using-d-i/modules/lowmem.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ using-d-i/modules/lowmem.xml	(working copy)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@
 One of the first things &d-i; does, is to check available memory.
 If the available memory is limited, this component will make some
 changes in the installation process which hopefully will allow
-you to install &debian; on your system.
+you to install &distr-full; on your system.
 
 </para><para>
 
Index: using-d-i/modules/iso-scan.xml
===================================================================
--- using-d-i/modules/iso-scan.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ using-d-i/modules/iso-scan.xml	(working copy)
@@ -2,11 +2,11 @@
 <!-- $Id$ -->
 
    <sect3 id="iso-scan">
-   <title>Looking for the Debian Installer ISO Image</title>
+   <title>Looking for the &D-I; ISO Image</title>
 <para>
 
 When installing via the <emphasis>hd-media</emphasis> method, there
-will be a moment where you need to find and mount the Debian Installer
+will be a moment where you need to find and mount the &D-I;
 iso image in order to get the rest of the installation files. The
 component <command>iso-scan</command> does exactly this.
 
Index: using-d-i/using-d-i.xml
===================================================================
--- using-d-i/using-d-i.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ using-d-i/using-d-i.xml	(working copy)
@@ -2,12 +2,12 @@
 <!-- $Id$ -->
 
 
- <chapter id="d-i-intro"><title>Using the Debian Installer</title>
+ <chapter id="d-i-intro"><title>Using the &D-I;</title>
 
  <sect1><title>How the Installer Works</title>
 <para>
 
-The Debian Installer consists of a number of special-purpose
+The &D-I; consists of a number of special-purpose
 components to perform each installation task. Each component performs
 its task, asking the user questions as necessary to do its job.
 The questions themselves are given priorities, and the priority
Index: hardware/hardware-supported.xml
===================================================================
--- hardware/hardware-supported.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ hardware/hardware-supported.xml	(working copy)
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@
 
 <para>
 
-Debian &release; supports eleven major architectures and several
+Debian &release-version; supports eleven major architectures and several
 variations of each architecture known as <quote>flavors</quote>.
 
 </para><para>
@@ -194,7 +194,7 @@
 
 </para><para condition="new-arch">
 
-This is the first official release of &debian; for the &arch-title;
+This is the first official release of &distr-full; for the &arch-title;
 architecture.  We feel that it has proven itself sufficiently to be
 released. However, because it has not had the exposure (and hence
 testing by users) that some other architectures have had, you may
@@ -238,7 +238,7 @@
 underlying support found in X.Org's X11 system.  Most AGP, PCI and
 PCIe video cards work under X.Org.  Details on supported graphics
 buses, cards, monitors, and pointing devices can be found at
-<ulink url="&url-xorg;"></ulink>.  Debian &release; ships
+<ulink url="&url-xorg;"></ulink>.  Debian &release-version; ships
 with X.Org version &x11ver;.
 
 </para><para arch="mips">
@@ -281,7 +281,7 @@
 
 Multi-processor support &mdash; also called <quote>symmetric multi-processing</quote>
 or SMP &mdash; is available for this architecture.  The standard Debian
-&release; kernel image was compiled with SMP support.  This should not
+&release-version; kernel image was compiled with SMP support.  This should not
 prevent installation, since the SMP kernel should boot on non-SMP systems;
 the kernel will simply cause a bit more overhead.
 
@@ -305,7 +305,7 @@
 
 Multi-processor support &mdash; also called <quote>symmetric
 multi-processing</quote> or SMP &mdash; is available for this architecture.
-However, the standard Debian &release; kernel image does not support
+However, the standard Debian &release-version; kernel image does not support
 SMP.  This should not prevent installation, since the standard,
 non-SMP kernel should boot on SMP systems; the kernel will simply use
 the first CPU.
Index: hardware/supported/alpha.xml
===================================================================
--- hardware/supported/alpha.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ hardware/supported/alpha.xml	(working copy)
@@ -448,7 +448,7 @@
 
 <para>
 
-It is believed that Debian &releasename; supports installing on all
+It is believed that Debian &release-tech; supports installing on all
 alpha sub-architectures with the exception of the ARC-only Ruffian and
 XL sub-architectures and the Titan subarchitecture, which requires a
 change to the kernel compile options.
Index: hardware/supported/mips.xml
===================================================================
--- hardware/supported/mips.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ hardware/supported/mips.xml	(working copy)
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@
 
 Complete information regarding supported mips/mipsel machines can be found
 at the <ulink url="&url-linux-mips;">Linux-MIPS homepage</ulink>.  In the
-following, only the systems supported by the Debian installer will be
+following, only the systems supported by the &D-I; will be
 covered.  If you are looking for support for other subarchitectures, please
 contact the <ulink url="&url-list-subscribe;">
 debian-&arch-listname; mailing list</ulink>.
Index: hardware/supported/mipsel.xml
===================================================================
--- hardware/supported/mipsel.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ hardware/supported/mipsel.xml	(working copy)
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@
 
 Complete information regarding supported mips/mipsel machines can be found
 at the <ulink url="&url-linux-mips;">Linux-MIPS homepage</ulink>.  In the
-following, only the systems supported by the Debian installer will be
+following, only the systems supported by the &D-I; will be
 covered.  If you are looking for support for other subarchitectures, please
 contact the <ulink url="&url-list-subscribe;">
 debian-&arch-listname; mailing list</ulink>.
Index: hardware/installation-media.xml
===================================================================
--- hardware/installation-media.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ hardware/installation-media.xml	(working copy)
@@ -193,7 +193,7 @@
 <para>
 
 If you are running another Unix-like system, you could use it to install
-&debian; without using the &d-i; described in the rest of the
+&distr-full; without using the &d-i; described in the rest of the
 manual. This kind of install may be useful for users with otherwise
 unsupported hardware or on hosts which can't afford downtime.  If you
 are interested in this technique, skip to the <xref
Index: boot-installer/alpha.xml
===================================================================
--- boot-installer/alpha.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ boot-installer/alpha.xml	(working copy)
@@ -61,12 +61,12 @@
 </para><para>
 
 GNU/Linux is the only operating system on Alpha that can be booted from
-both console types, but &debian; &release; only supports booting on
+both console types, but &distr-full; &release-version; only supports booting on
 SRM-based systems.  If you have an Alpha for which no version of SRM is
 available, if you will be dual-booting the system with Windows NT, or if
 your boot device requires ARC console support for BIOS initialization,
-you will not be able to use the &debian; &release; installer.  You can
-still run &debian; &release; on such systems by using other install
+you will not be able to use the &distr-full; &release-version; installer.  You can
+still run &distr-full; &release-version; on such systems by using other install
 media; for instance, you can install Debian woody with MILO and upgrade.
 
 </para><para>
@@ -248,7 +248,7 @@
 firmware.  Also, once SRM is installed, it is possible to run
 ARC/AlphaBIOS from a floppy disk (using the <command>arc</command>
 command).  For the reasons mentioned above, we recommend switching to
-SRM before installing &debian;.
+SRM before installing &distr-full;.
 
 </para><para>
 
@@ -261,7 +261,7 @@
 for more information.
 </para>
 
-</footnote> before installing &debian;.
+</footnote> before installing &distr-full;.
 For Alpha, firmware updates can be obtained from
 <ulink url="&url-alpha-firmware;">Alpha Firmware Updates</ulink>.
 
Index: boot-installer/mipsel.xml
===================================================================
--- boot-installer/mipsel.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ boot-installer/mipsel.xml	(working copy)
@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@
 <para>
 
 On the Broadcom BCM91250A and BCM91480B evaluation boards, you have to load the SiByl boot
-loader via TFTP which will then load and start the Debian installer.  In
+loader via TFTP which will then load and start the &D-I;.  In
 most cases, you will first obtain an IP address via DHCP but it is also
 possible to configure a static address.  In order to use DHCP, you can
 enter the following command on the CFE prompt:
Index: boot-installer/parameters.xml
===================================================================
--- boot-installer/parameters.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ boot-installer/parameters.xml	(working copy)
@@ -67,7 +67,7 @@
 </para>
 
 
-  <sect2 id="installer-args"><title>Debian Installer Parameters</title>
+  <sect2 id="installer-args"><title>&D-I; Parameters</title>
 <para>
 
 The installation system recognizes a few additional boot parameters<footnote>
@@ -195,7 +195,7 @@
 <listitem><para>
 
 The value of the parameter is the path to the device to load the
-Debian installer from. For example,
+&D-I; from. For example,
 <userinput>INSTALL_MEDIA_DEV=/dev/floppy/0</userinput>
 
 </para><para>
Index: boot-installer/ia64.xml
===================================================================
--- boot-installer/ia64.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ boot-installer/ia64.xml	(working copy)
@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@
 
 </para><para>
 
-The Debian Installer CD contains a small EFI partition where the
+The &D-I; CD contains a small EFI partition where the
 <command>ELILO</command> bootloader, its configuration file, the installer's
 kernel, and initial filesystem (initrd) are located.
 The running system also contains an EFI partition where the necessary
@@ -162,7 +162,7 @@
 If, for some reason, option 1 is not successful, reboot the machine
 and when the EFI Boot Manager screen appears there should be
 one option called <command>EFI Shell [Built-in]</command>.
-Boot the Debian Installer CD with the following steps:
+Boot the &D-I; CD with the following steps:
 
 </para>
 
@@ -320,7 +320,7 @@
 Press <command>ENTER</command>.  This will load and start the
 kernel.
 The kernel will display its usual initialization messages followed
-by the first screen of the Debian Installer.
+by the first screen of the &D-I;.
 </para></listitem>
 
 </itemizedlist>
@@ -452,7 +452,7 @@
 At this point, the installation proceeds with the same steps as a
 CD install.  Select a boot option as in above and when the kernel
 has completed installing itself from the network, it will start the
-Debian Installer.
+&D-I;.
 
 </para><para>
 
Index: boot-installer/mips.xml
===================================================================
--- boot-installer/mips.xml	(revision 36764)
+++ boot-installer/mips.xml	(working copy)
@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@
 <para>
 
 On the Broadcom BCM91250A and BCM91480B evaluation boards, you have to load the SiByl boot
-loader via TFTP which will then load and start the Debian installer.  In
+loader via TFTP which will then load and start the &D-I;.  In
 most cases, you will first obtain an IP address via DHCP but it is also
 possible to configure a static address.  In order to use DHCP, you can
 enter the following command on the CFE prompt:
Index: entities/l10n/en.ent
===================================================================
--- entities/l10n/en.ent	(revision 0)
+++ entities/l10n/en.ent	(revision 0)
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+<!-- Empty file to avoid warnings when the manual is built. -->
Index: entities/l10n/nl.ent
===================================================================
--- entities/l10n/nl.ent	(revision 0)
+++ entities/l10n/nl.ent	(revision 0)
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+<!ENTITY MSG-YES "<userinput>Ja</userinput>">
+<!ENTITY MSG-NO "<userinput>Nee</userinput>">
Index: entities/common.ent
===================================================================
--- entities/common.ent	(revision 36764)
+++ entities/common.ent	(working copy)
@@ -1,16 +1,29 @@
 <!-- -*- DocBook -*- -->
-<!-- These entries should be language independent.  -->
-<!-- The *first* definition of an ENTITY wins.      -->
+<!-- Translations for entities should be listed in ./l10n/<lang>.ent.
+     See ./l10n/README for further information.
+     The *first* definition of an ENTITY wins. -->
 
+
+<!ENTITY distr            "Debian">
+<!ENTITY distr-full       "Debian GNU/Linux">
+
+<!ENTITY release-version  "3.1+&delta;">
+<!ENTITY release-name     "Etch">
+<!ENTITY release-tech     "etch">
+
+<!ENTITY D-I              "Debian Installer">
+<!ENTITY d-i-literal      "debian-installer">
+<!ENTITY d-i              "<classname>&d-i-literal;</classname>">
+
+<!-- OBSOLETED ENTITIES KEPT FOR TRANSITION PERIOD - START -->
 <!-- proper (long) name to use for Debian -->
 <!ENTITY debian "Debian GNU/Linux">
 
-<!ENTITY d-i "<classname>debian-installer</classname>">
-
 <!ENTITY release     "3.1+&delta;">
 <!ENTITY releasename "etch">
 <!ENTITY releasename-cap "Etch">
 <!ENTITY releasename-uc "ETCH">
+<!-- OBSOLETED ENTITIES KEPT FOR TRANSITION PERIOD - END -->
 
 <!ENTITY FIXME
   "<emphasis>Documentation not complete, text missing.</emphasis>">
Index: templates/install.xml.template
===================================================================
--- templates/install.xml.template	(revision 36764)
+++ templates/install.xml.template	(working copy)
@@ -9,7 +9,8 @@
  <!ENTITY % dbcent PUBLIC
       "-//OASIS//ENTITIES DocBook Character Entities V4.2//EN"
       "/usr/share/sgml/docbook/dtd/xml/4.2/dbcentx.mod"> %dbcent;
- <!ENTITY % dynamicdata    SYSTEM "../##TEMPDIR##/dynamic.ent"       > %dynamicdata;
+ <!ENTITY % dynamicdata    SYSTEM "../##TEMPDIR##/dynamic.ent"    > %dynamicdata;
+ <!ENTITY % langdata       SYSTEM "##ENTPATH##/l10n/##LANG##.ent" > %langdata;
  <!ENTITY % commondata     SYSTEM "##ENTPATH##/common.ent"        > %commondata;
  <!ENTITY % urlsdata       SYSTEM "##ENTPATH##/urls.ent"          > %urlsdata;
 
INSTRUCTIONS FOR TRANSLATING ENTITIES
=====================================

*** Please do not use yet; wait for announcement on d-i18n! ***

It is possible to translate entities used in the installation guide.
Note that only a few entities are suitable for translation. Others, for
instance those refering to package names, should not.

There are several reasons for using entities in the manual. One is to
improve consistency and to make it possible to maintain changing data in one
central location; another is to make it easier for derived distributions to
change the branding of the manual.
Given these goals the intention is to increase the use of entities. 

This also means that translators preferably should not replace entities by
fixed text. However, the standard set of entities may not be sufficient for
a good translation, for instance because a language needs different
conjugations for a word while in English this is not needed.

Translators are free to add additional entities if they need them for
different conjugations. Try to keep the names of the entities you add
logical. Examples:
xxx-dat (for dative conjugation)

If you feel some text in the English version of the manual could be replaced
by an entity, please send a mail to the debian-i18n list for discussion.

How to translate entities
=========================
- Add a new file <your_language_code>.ent in this directory.
- Copy the definition of the entity you want to translate from the relevant
  entity file (../common.ent).
- Replace the English value in the entity.

You can of course also copy the file for another language already in this
directory as a starting point.

Translatable entities
=====================
Please do not translate entities that are not listed below without discussing
this first on the debian-boot list!

- distr
- distr-full
- release-name (should probably not be translated for most languages)
- D-I
- enterkey
- MSG-YES
- MSG-NO

Non-translatable entities
=========================
The entities below should _not_ be translated. If you think an entity listed
below is used in a way that it should be translated, this is possably a bug
that should be fixed in the original text rather than a reason to translate it.

- distr-tech
- release-version
- release-tech
- d-i
- d-i-literal
- manual-pkg

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