[Date Prev][Date Next] [Thread Prev][Thread Next] [Date Index] [Thread Index]

Serious jobs for serious people. No investment needed.



To study single molecules, Block has pioneered the use of optical tweezers, tiny laser-based "tractor beams" that produce miniscule piconewton forces to drag around molecules and allow measurements of displacements on the order of a nanometer. "You can stop and stall molecules, w follow their motion. Recently, we've studied the backtracking of RNA polymerase: when it makes a mistake, it can actually back up by five bases, scoop off the wrong thing and start again," says Block. While biological nanotechnology "hasn't even arrived at its infancy yet," says Block, "biological nanoscience is a very exciting place to be right now, because the techniques now exist to truly study proteins, and we're learning so much about them."

Hello,
First and Primarily, we would kindly like to convey our warmest greetings to you and your family and wish you all good condition and happiness and more success in dealing. Our Worldwide Corporation in search of new staff on different vacancies. We are by now for a long time in the market and now we recruit employees to occupation from home.

Our Corporation Main center is positioned in United Kingdom with branches all over the world. Our greatest desire now is to expand our business scale to more countries, so we are advertising here in hope of cooperating with you all. We highly appreciate honest and creative employers. You do not need to invest any sum of money and we do not ask you to give us with your bank account number! We are engaged in completely legal activity and working in our company you can reach career growth at a permanent job.

We are seeking a highly motivated specialist, with skill of working with people. The position is home-based. We offer a part-time position with flexible working hours. And we would be happy to consider a full-time job share applicant.

The right individual will have good consultation and interpersonal skills and some knowledge of marketing. Candidates must be able to remain focused and motivated when working alone.

Thank you and we are looking forward to work together in long-standing basis with you all.
If you are interested in our vacancies, please feel free to make contact with us for further information.
The preference is given to employees with knowledge of foreign languages. If you are interested please send the following information to: IvyHernandezWU@gmail.com
1) Full name
2) Contact phone numbers
3) Languages
4) Part time job/Full time

We are looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Yours sincerely,
alwin alun


18 Stanford Scientific Review successfully demonstrated their use as highly sensitive toxic gas sensors, and with Professor Calvin Quate (Electrical Engineering), has commercialized nanotubes as scanning probe tips to increase probe resolution and tip durability. An area that Dai has just begun exploring is the drug delivery potential of carbon nanotubes. "The tube has a large surface area and is empty inside. So either you can attach the drug to the outer surface, or fill it up like a test tube," says Dai. Furthermore, multiple functional molecules can be attached to the surface: "Say, a molecule that fluoresces to tell you where the drug is in the cell and an antibody that specifically targets the site of drug delivery." So far, Dai reports that his research finds nanotubes to be quite "biologically friendly."
To study single molecules, Block has pioneered the use of optical tweezers, tiny laser-based "tractor beams" that produce miniscule piconewton forces to drag around molecules and allow measurements of displacements on the order of a nanometer. "You can stop and stall molecules, w follow their motion. Recently, we've studied the backtracking of RNA polymerase: when it makes a mistake, it can actually back up by five bases, scoop off the wrong thing and start again," says Block. While biological nanotechnology "hasn't even arrived at its infancy yet," says Block, "biological nanoscience is a very exciting place to be right now, because the techniques now exist to truly study proteins, and we're learning so much about them."
As the global energy demand continues to rise, the need for renewable energy sources has become ever more urgent. One candidate fuel for the future is hydrogen. Professor McGehee is hot on the trail, developing solar cells to generate electricity, which can then be used to zap water apart electrolytically into hydrogen (and oxygen) with 80% efficiency.




Reply to: