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Nature's own marvelous nanoscale machines include motors that spin bacterial flagella at up to 1000 revolutions per second and polymerases that step along DNA and RNA to facilitate the flow of genetic information. Block, along with other Stanford researchers such as Professors W. E. Moerner (Chemistry) and Steve Chu (Physics), are studying Nature's machines through single molecule science. This young field is devoted to following molecules one at a time rather than observing their averaged behavior, as has been done traditionally. To understand why average properties may obscure molecular behavior, "Consider a ship traveling from New York to San Francisco," says Block. "If it's small enough, it will travel down into the Caribbean and go across the Panama Canal and then back up to San Francisco. If it's a big oil tanker, it won't fit through the Panama Canal; it's got to go all the way around Cape Horn. But the average path of a ship traveling from New York to San Francisco would probably come out somewhere in the middle of the Amazon where there is in fact no route at all!"

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Here's To Biology: Nature's Own Nanomachines Dr. Steve Block, Biology and Applied Physics
Nature's own marvelous nanoscale machines include motors that spin bacterial flagella at up to 1000 revolutions per second and polymerases that step along DNA and RNA to facilitate the flow of genetic information. Block, along with other Stanford researchers such as Professors W. E. Moerner (Chemistry) and Steve Chu (Physics), are studying Nature's machines through single molecule science. This young field is devoted to following molecules one at a time rather than observing their averaged behavior, as has been done traditionally. To understand why average properties may obscure molecular behavior, "Consider a ship traveling from New York to San Francisco," says Block. "If it's small enough, it will travel down into the Caribbean and go across the Panama Canal and then back up to San Francisco. If it's a big oil tanker, it won't fit through the Panama Canal; it's got to go all the way around Cape Horn. But the average path of a ship traveling from New York to San Francisco would probably come out somewhere in the middle of the Amazon where there is in fact no route at all!"
While sunlight is cheap, harnessing it is currently too expensive to be worthwhile on a large scale. For four years, McGehee and his graduate students have been working to make it cheaper to convert sunlight into electricity. While the silicon-based solar cells currently used generate electricity at $3/Watt, McGehee is aiming for nanostructured solar cells that are ten times cheaper at $.30/Watt. Once fully developed, McGehee's solar cells would be lower cost because the materials are cheaper. Moreover, they would be more lightweight and flexible so that "you could roll them out over rooftops," says McGehee.




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